Landkreis Rastatt

Sponsored by: Faith Haungs (ehaung@aol.com)


This is an alphabethic listing of information on thecommunities that have existed within Landkreis Rastatt. Select the correct letter here, to locate the alphabetic section that contains the community that you are researching and valuable information about it.

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R-Z

Iffezheim

Geography:
With a current population of around 4,000, Iffezheim is 19,95 square kilometers in size. It is located southwest, ten kilometers from the city of Rastatt.

History:
First hint of Iffezheim can be found in the year 1225, under the name Uffinsheim (name of Uffin).Originally the town belonged under the jurisdiction of Ortensau and was under Baden leadership. Later Iffezheim was ruled by the city of Stollhofen. In 1790, it became part of the county of Rastatt.
The spring meeting of the international club of Baden-Baden has made the name Iffezheim not only known in Germany, but also abroad, and brought the community the nickname "Racing Community." The annual spring races bring an international flavor to the usually quiet and more contemplative place.
Edouard Benazel, the founder of the Baden-Baden Racing Association , introduced the race in 1858 to Iffezheim. Since 1969, the once valued "Farmers Race", at which amateurs have the chance to show what they can do, takes place at the same time. These races were originally more of a thank you from the high masters to the farmers of the village for helping with the preparation of the main event race Today, the races are fun for both the participants and spectators.

Emigrant Surnames:
Ambros, Eisemann, Eller, Erhard, Fritz, Greß, Groß, Hatz, Heitz, Herr, Heyer, Huber, Huck, Huttlinger, Jacob, Jakob, Jülig, Kohler, Leichtner, Leppert, Merkel, Metz, Nachbauer, Oesterle, Peter, Pfetzer, RIchter, Schäfer, Scheffel, Schmitt, Schneider, Schocher, Schubert, Schwarz, Siegel, Sievert Walter, Weber, Wilhelm, Wirkner, Wurz, Ziegler, Zimber, Zoller

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth and baptisms: 1731-1900
marriages: 1731-1900
death and burial: 1731-1889
confirmations: 1895-1900
family registry: 1679, 1818

Links:

Researchers in this area:
John@johnmerkel.com (Would like to hear from anyone in Iffezheim that is online.)

Illingen(see also Elchesheim)

Geography:
Located on the Rhein River and sharing the Goldkanal Lake with the town of Elchesheim. It is only 15 kilometers from the city of Karlsruhe.

History:
First mentioned in the official documents in 960 as "Ulrich" it was part of the Rhein River estate of Lautenberg, under the possession of Speyer. There was a ferry service near Illingen in 1288, which traded goods with the Alsace town of Mothern. In 1743, the Bishop of Speyer set a traders tax for all the users of the ferry service and all the villagers of Illingen. Through mutual cooperation Ilingen was incorporated with the town of Elchesheim in 1923.

Emigrant Surnames:
Bitterwolf, Busch, Deck, Fischer, Fütterer, Heck, Jörger, Mößner, Schickel, Späth, Wittmann

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1733 - 1921
marriages: 1734 - 1935
death and burial: 1734 - 1942
confirmations: 1739 - 1779

Evangelical - Lutheran
births: 1733 - 1924
marriages: 1734 - 1935
death and burial: 1734 - 1942
confirmations: 1739 - 1779

Links:

Kapplewindeck

Geography: Located in the "wine region" of the Rhein Valley, Kappelwindeck is seven kilometers south of its parent parish of Buhlertal and 15 kilometers southwest of the city of Buehl. Known as the home of the Windeck Castle it has become the most chosen motif to publicize the Buhler area.

History:
In the 14th century the palace on the hill became the residence of an aristocratic family, the Windecks. They achieved power and prestige as feudatory tenants of the Ebersteins. When gunpowder was invented, the fortress lost its value and, as a result, the Margraves were no longer interested in its maintenance. In order to increase their power they secured an interest in the castle as the Windeckers lost political and economic influence. The last Windecker took residence at the castle and went into service as part of the Strassburg civil service. The male line of the Windeck's died out in 1592. The castle was then allowed to decay and was forgotten.
Later, it became the possession of the Frauenhalb Cloister, where it was turned into a hereditary fief. As was usual in the times, the hermitage possessed, as titled, the right to sell wine, as in a tavern.
The romantic age of the 19th century was the rediscovery of the Windeck Castle, and the Middle ages. Kappelwindeck developed a summer resort economy, in that it was often a visited excursion goal.
The land surrounding the castle was, in the 14th and 15th century, primarily vineyards. By the 16th century Kappelwindeck was noted as the largest winery in the region.
The Kaiserlinde, Kaiser's linden tree is at the center of Kappelwindeck. Festivals and celebrations take place here. Here is where the people of Kappelwindeck play band music, and the younger people shriek with delight and dance in the dance arbors. A linden tree in Kappelwindeck is mentioned as early as 1430.
Kappelwindeck was incorporated into the district city of Buehl in 1932, through the mutual consent of both towns

In the year 1392 - St. Maria, Earliest Catholic Church

Information Sources:
Kappelwindeck (Buehl)
Catholic
births, marriages and deaths: 1810-1870

Kappelwindeck (Kappelwindeck)
births and baptisms: 1691-1900
marriages: 1691-1900
deaths and burial: 1710-1900
confirmations: 1696-1710
family registry: 1696, 1700, 1710

Links: See Black Forest Legends

Kartung

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:

Information Sources:

Links:

Kuppenheim

Geography:
Kuppenheim is located just 5 km. south of its parent parish of Rastatt. Thanks to its favorable location on the Murg River at the entrance to the Murg Valley, it was regarded as the first fortified town in the Oosgau.

History:
Kuppenheim was first documented in 1100. By 1254 it was known as a market town. In 1283 the town first became part of Baden. A margravial document of 1453 stated Kuppenheim as the seat of civil administration with authority over 14 villages. It was elevated as a county seat in 1535, with authority over 22 villages, including Gaggenau.
History also records severe setbacks for Kuppenheim. Among these were the 30 years war and August 24, 1689, when Kuppenheim and Baden-Baden were put to the torch by the French. At that time, the town of Kuppenheim lost its designation as county seat.
Preserved for history were the town charter, the remains of the town wall, the moat as well as the layout of the old town.

Emigrant Surnames:
Adam, Bader, Bender, Boh, Daigler, Deck, Deugler, Düringer, Eger, Föry, Fritsch, Kastner, Demper, Knörr, Koch, Kolb, Krieg, Kuppenheimer, Leopold, Lepold, Mai, Merkel, Mühleisen, Müller, Mürb, Neff, Nöder, Oser, Rammelmayer, Raub, Reilsberger, Röder, Roos, Schmidt, Schmitt, Schuh, Schuler, Schulz, Seitz, Siefert, Stadehofer, Stein, Stemmle, Walz, Warth, Weinschenk, Wendelgaß, Westermann, Wetzel, Wittmaier

Information Sources:
Catholic (originals) birth and baptism : 1694-to the present
marriages: 1694-to the present
death and burial: 1712- to the present
compiled manuscript family books exist and are microfilmed

Jewish (originals)
birth, marriage and deaths: 1812-to the present

Researchers in this area:
http://www.kastners.info
Researching: Fritsch, Goerig (Gerig), Juengling, Kappler, Knoerr (Knerr), Mueller, Roos (Rohs, Ros), Walz (Waltz), Warth
sewqlt@aol.com
Researching: Herz / Hertz, Koelmel, Weiler, Boh, Graf, Wittenauer, Ming / Mink, Frosch, Juengling, Werner/Woerner, Walz/ Waltz, Warth, Faist, Kray (Grui, Crui, Cruy, Gray,Krai)

Links:

Langenbrand

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Fritz, Gerstner, Heitzler, Kalmbacher, Klumpp, Künstel, Merkel, Schaub, Schoch

Information Sources:

Links:

Lautenbach

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Fortenbacher, Geiger, Kiemer,Klumpp, Kraft, Mörmann, Moser, Rothenberger, Schelling, Schiel, Schillinger, Welzenberger

Information Sources:

Links:

Leiberstung

Geography:
Leiberstung is located only four km. from Schwarzach and 6 km. from Steinbach. Known as a agricultural town, cattle breeding and fruit growing are the residents main souce of income. Tobacco crops and basket weaving are a secondary source of profit

History:
In early times, Lieberstung was the Eberstein-Baden fiefdom of the Lords of Badenstein and of Bach. Precinct names like Burgstaden (fortress stead) and Rittersmatt (knightmeade) reminds everyone that in early times a moated castle stood in this village.
The town chapel, called St. Wendlin, was built in 1810. Wendlin being the patron saint of farmers and cattlemen, made this name most appropriate. The original school house and Rathhaus (town hall) were built in 1829.
Religiously, Leiberstung is an outpost of the Schwarzach parish of St. Peter and Paul's, though Leiberstung residents are buried in their own town.

Emigrant Surnames:
Diebold, Droll, Ernst, Faißt, Feist, Friedmann, Frietsch, Ibach, Kiefer, Koch, Kreidenweis, Lorenz, Meier, Schuh, Seiler, Speier, Speierer, Striebich, Velten, Weingartner, Würz

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth and baptisms: 1810 - 1870
marriages: 1810 - 1870
death and burial: 1810 - 1869

Links:

Lichtenau

Geography:
Located approximately 12 miles west of Baden-Baden on the Ulmer Creek, that it shares with the town of Ulm, Lichtenau covers 27,62 square kilometers.

History:
The founder of Lichtenowe, as Lichtenau was called in 1293, was the Strassburger Bishop, Konrad III, from the aristocratic family Von Lichtenberg. Not only did he build the town but, also established a Waterfortress. A deep moat surrounded the grounds. The only thing pointing to the early era of Lichtenau's past is a model in the town hall and the stretchtower ruins. Lichtenau, therefor, had early on, a systematic connection to the fortress in the estuary of the streams Acher and Schwarzwasser. This fortress was meant to protect the bishop's right Rheinische possessions. For the special merits of the bishop and his nephew Johann I, for the service to the Habsburger King and the Emperor Albrecht I, he bestowed in his charter from Jan. 14th 1300 the fortress Lichtenau it's townrights, and guaranteed the citizens the right to personal freedom. Lichtenau was the officeseat (meaning official capital seat) and from 1335 until 1379 temporary residence. In 1504 Lichtenau and the "Hanauerland" transferred to the Earls of Hanau-Lichtenberg (then later on to Hessen-Darmstadt). In 1632 emperor's troops destroyed the town. In 1689 the French wasted the surrounding area also. Between 1805 and 1815 Napoleon Bonaparte stopped in Lichtenau a few times. Even before 1800, the fortress disappeared, and in 1803 Lichtenau came out of the ownership of the Landearl of Hessen-Darmstadt and to the house of Baden.
As the county Kehl was dissolved due to the Baden-Wurtenberg's county reform, Lichtenau came to the county of Rastatt on Jan. 1st 1973. In stages, so to speak, the community reform took it's effect. One after another the independent communities of Scherheim (1972), Ulm (1973), Muckenschopf (1974) and Grauelsbaum (1975), pushed into the now established districts in the city of Lichtenau. Their total number of residents today is over 4000, Lichtenau sets itself apart from the others as the biggest district.

Emigrant Surnames:
Accuntius, Auerbach, Bertsch, Bautel, Billing, Binder, Bieuler, Börschig, Cahn, Dietrich, Duttweiler, Eisenstein, Fässler, Frei, Frick, Götz, Gorth, Härrer, Hermann, Hermann, Huber, Hübscher, Jung, Kah, Kahl, Kahn, Kaufmann, Kautz, Kirschenmann, Knösel, Korn, Lasch, Lauppe, Liebig, Ludwig, Lutz, Mann, Marz, Nessler, Pfadt, Pfaadt, Pfenzinger, Rehfuß, Rohr, Ross, Schiff, Schilling, Schlick, Schmidt, Schmitt, Schneider, Schoch, Schulz, Schwarz, Specht, Stengel, Timeus, Vix, Vogt, Waffenschmidt, Wahl, Weis, Wiess Wenger, Widtmann, Wittmann, Wöhrle, Zimmer, Zimpfer

Information Sources:

Lichtenau (Grauelsbaum and Helmlingen)
Evangelical - Lutheran
birth and baptism: 1565-1595
birth and baptism: 1652-1863
birth and baptism: 1870-1962
marriages: 1566-1596
marriages: 1605-1623
marriages: 1652-1718
marriages: 1736-1962
death and burial: 1605-1622
death and burial: 1652-1718
death and burial: 1736-1965

Lichtenau
Jewish
birth: 1812-1870
marriages: 1812-1870
death and burial: 1812-1870

Evangelical-Lutheran
Civil Records
birth and baptism: 1810-1870
birth: 1565-1595
marriages: 1810-1870
marriages: 1652-1863
death and burial: 1810-1870
death and burial: 1870-1962

Links:

Researchers in this area:
SAJGE@aol.com
duttgen@flash.netZ

Loffenau

Geography:
The independent community of Loffenau was added to the county of Rastatt in the Reformation Act of 1973. The town covers an area of 17.07 square kilometers and has a small population of 2,700 inhabitants. Located east of the town of Gernsbach, Loffenau has a geographical advantage being situated between the Albtal and Murgtal Rivers.

History:
Loffenau was originally a cleared settlement in the area of the "Speyerian" Rotenfel. In 1266, the Counts of Eberstein ceded "von Lovfenove" (lowland traversed by rivers and lakes) to Herrenaub . Dominance over the town went to the Monastery of Herrenaub in 1297. During the reformation of Herrenaub in 1555, Loffenau became part of the State of Wurttemberg.
In our century, in 1938, the community became part of the county of Calw. Later, this independent community was under the jurisdiction of Baden.
Loffenau had its first community leaders as early as 1369. The industriousness of the early citizens of Loffenau can be recognized by the fact that in 1820 the town contained two grist mills, three oil mills and six inns with rooms for rent. The town received market rights in 1877.
Today, Loffenau is one of the smaller communities of the county, a commuter community. But even tourism plays an important role here, which is expressed by its rating as a "federally recognized resort". Visitors can take advantage of the picturesque hiking trails and the Devil's Mill, with its mysterious tower. Loffenau has also been well known as a mecca for hang gliders. In 1979, Loffenau served as the town for the German hang gliders championships.

Emigrant Surnames:
Ablidauer, Albar, Adam Bertsch, Braun, Dorn, Geßler, Grau, Grimm, Großhanns, Hecker, Herb, Kellner, Klenk, Kyre, Lehmann, Luft, Mahler, Mangler, Meermann, Merkle, Möhrmann, Müller, Römmele, Seeger, Stein, Stickel, Stückel, Streeb, Sturm, Treiber, Volz, Walz, Wildner, Zeltmann, Zimmermann, Zollmann.

Information Sources:
Evangelical-Lutheran birth and baptism: 1595-1883 marriages: 1662-1894 death and burial: 1662-1896 family registry: 1770, 1814, 1843

Links:

Memprechtshofen

Geography:

History:
Memprechtshofen was incorporated into the newly created city of Rheinau January 1, 1975, along with the villages of Diersheim, Freistett, Hausgereut, Helmlingen, Holzhausen, Honau, Linx, and Rheinbischofsheim.

Information Sources:

Links:

Researchers in this area:
SAJGE@aol.com

Michelbach (also see Gaggenau)

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Anselm, Bastian, Bittmann, Dillinger, Eisele, Ernst, Götz, Herm, Hirth, Huck, Imberi, Karcher, Klumpp, Kraft, Latein, Lust, Rieger, Schiebenes, Seiser, Sieb, Traub, Tschan, Viola, Wagenr, Wick

Researchers in this area:
glassman@iquest.net
Researching Surnames: Tschan, Bastian, Wick and Hirth
tombitt@aol.com

Information Sources:

Links:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~bittman/michelbach.htm

Moos

Geography:
Moos is a small village 129 meters above sea level and 7 kilometers from the capitol of the district, Buhl. Originally named Mose in the 1300's by the late 1400's the name was Moos, or marsh land. Due to the regulation of the Rhein River there is little marshy land now. The people of Moos are well-known for their horse breeding and plum growing.

History:
In the year 1326 - St. Dionis, Earliest Catholic Church
First developed from the farms of the Monastery Abbey Schwarzach. Early in the 15th century Moos was a fief of the Masters of Rittersbach. By the end of the 15th century Moos was a fief of the Knight from Tiefenau near Zinzheim. The vassals had to give 16 qts of grain, 2 qts. of oats, 2 turkeys, 2 chickens and 3 schillings.
During the 30 Years War, 26 houses were burned and 38 citizens were killed. For the next eight years no one lived in Moos. The inhabitants moved back to Schwarzach.
A chapel was bulit in 1358 and consecrated to St. Nicholas, St. Erhard, St Theobald and St. Katherina. The parish church was built between 1784 and 1788. It is dedicated to St. Dionis, which has lead to one male child from every family being named Dionis. The feast day of St. Dionis is October 3rd, which is during harvest time. Most of the month of October is "Festspiele" or festival time in Moos. Since 1809 St. Dionis parish has been an independent parish. Before that time the parishioners of Moos attended services at St. Peter and Paul Church in Schwarzach.
Some examples of outstanding architecture in Moos are the Elsass Inn and the Rossle Inn. The Rossle Inn was owned by the Striebich family for 5 generations, starting in the early 1700's.
Moos was one of the many small villages incorporated in the city of Buhl in the district reorganization of 1972.

Emigrant Surnames:
Allgaier, Burst, Ditzer, Droll, Faller, Friedmann, Frietsch, Götz, Haungs, Huber, Hurst, Ibach, Käbler, Kempfer, Klöpfer, Knebel, Krumholz, Küstner, Leppert, Lorenz, Metzinger, Nöltner, Ochs, Ruschmann, Seiler, Spitzmesser, Streibich, Trapp, Volz, Wagner, Winter, Wölfel, Wolf, Würnz

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1810 - 1870
marriages: 1810 - 1870
death and burial: 1810 - 1870
confirmations: 1852 - 1870

Civil
births: 1743 - 1900
marriages: 1810 - 1900
death and burial: 1810 - 1900
family registry: 1743 - 1809
family registry: 1811 - 1825

Links:

Researchers in this area:
Faith Haungs

Muckenschopf

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Bauer, Blumenstein, Bertsch, Durban, Fritz, Goll, Heidt, Hermann, Käser, Kautz, Mainzer, Stöss, Wahl, Zimmer

Information Sources:

Researchers in this area:
duttgen@flash.netZ

Links:

Muggensturm

Geography:
Located directly west of the city of Rastatt, Muggensturm is known as an industrial town. The population is a little more than 6,000 inhabitants and the town covers 11.55 square kilometers.

History:
A Celtic arm ring and three Roman bronze brooches, now located in the Baden State Museum in Karlsruhe, are evidence of settlements in the area during Roman times.
The first documented reference to Muggensturm is found in the year 1193. The present day spelling was registered by 1296. It is possible that Muggensturm was an extension of the town of Oetigheim, and an old Eberstein possession that was enlarged by the relocation of Eichelbach.
St. Margaret's Chapel, today the Muggensturm Cemetery Chapel, was the local church for the abandoned village of Eichelbach, which has completely vanished today. Muggensturm was the possession of the Counts of Eberstein and the Herrenalb Cloister. These holdings were later transferred and Heinrich von Eberstein ordered the removal of the inhabitants of Eichelbach to Muggensturm in 1298.
After 1353, Muggensturm is mentioned several times as a city. A previous fortress had fallen to ruin by the 15th century. In the 16th century there was no longer a city wall.
In the past years, Muggensturm has increased its amount of industry, trade and business thanks to the vigorous promotion by the city administrators. As a results, a substantial number of work places have been developed. A few years back a recreational park was built at the edge of the city, with a tennis hall, wildlife enclosure and fitness trails. The locality's image has significantly improved in the last decade. This has been made clear through the success in town beautification during that time.

Emigrant Surnames:
Adam, Baumann, Baumstark, Bechler, Berlinghoff, Dahringer, Dimmler, Fütterer, Götzmann, Großmann, Heck, Hornung, Huber, Jocher, Kappler, Kastner, Kleehammer, Knapp, Knobloch, König, Kraft, Kraus, Mack, Meder, Melcher, Raub, Schick, Schnepf, Späth, Stoll, Unser, Weßbecher, Westermann, Zittel

Information Sources:
Catholic/Civil Records
birth and baptism: 1655-1900
marriages: 1656-1900, 1920-1964
deaths and burial: 1654-1900

Links:

Researchers in this area:
hornung@shaw.wave.ca

Müllhofen

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:

Information Sources:

Links:

Neusatz

Geography:

Postal Code:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Amrhein, Bader, Bäuerle, Baumann, Bisch, Braun, Dauel, Denu, Dietrich, Dresel, Düppner, Eberle, Fäh, Falk, Faller, Feist, Feißt, Friedmann, Ganter, Glaser, Götz, Gschwender, Hauser, Hechinger, Helferich, Herr, Herrmann, Hirth, Hörth, Huber, Ihle, Jordan, Karcher, Kern, Kientz, Kirn, Kist, Kohler, Lamprecht, Lank Lohmüller, Lorenz, Manz, März, merz, Maier, Meier, Moser, Müller, Nöltner, Rebholz, Riehle, Sackmann, Schäfer, Schaufler, Schiffmacher, Schmitt, Schnurr, Schofer, Schuh, Sperl, Steuer, Streule, Weis, Weisser, Werner, Wörner, Wittenauer, Zink

Information Sources:

Researchers in this area:
conlaeth@juno.com
Researching Surname: Maurath

Links:

Neuweier

Geography:

History:

St. Urban, Earliest Catholic Church

Information Sources:

Researchers in this area:
LPKnecht@aol.com
Researching surnames: Dressel and Walther

Links:

Niederbühl

Geography:
The former independent town of Niederbuehl is only five kilometers south of the city of Rastatt. It covers an area of 8,27 square kilometers and has 2,800 inhabitants. Niederbuehl was incorporated into the city of Rastatt in 1972.

History:

Information Sources:
Catholic
births: 1697-1883
confirmations: 1816-1889
marriages: 1704-1791
marriages: 1842-1900
burials: 1704-1891
family registry: 1882
Evangelical-Lutheran
birth: 1869-1962
marriages: 1900-1963
burials: 1901-1964

Emigrant Surnames:
Adam Axtmann, Fritsch, Hermann, Herrmann, Keßler, Keifer, Kühner, Linner, Rudolf, Ruß, Scharer, Scherer, Wagner, Walz, Warth, Weckerle, Wich, Wiech, Wußler

Information Sources:

Links:

Oberbruch

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Allgeier, Bohn Burkard, Burkart, Dilzer, Droll, Ehinger, Enes, Fritz, Gartner, Fraf, Haungs, Jörger, Köhle, Kühlmeier, Lienhardt, Seiler, Spitzmesser, Wiemer

Information Sources:

Links:

Oberbuhlertal

Geography:

History:

Information Sources:

Links:

Oberndorf

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Daul, Götzmann, Haas, Hatz, Hertweck, Hörig, Karcher, Kraft, Mack, Orth, Sommer, Stahlberger, Westermann, Wold, Wunsch, Wurz

Information Sources:

Links:

Obertsrot

Geography:
Obertsrot is 6km. southeast of the city of Baden Baden. It has been incorporated into the city of Gernsbach.

Postal Code:
76593 Gernsbach-Obertsrot

History:
The Reformation in Obertsrot
Obertsrot, originally a Catholic community, turned to Protestantism during the Reformation. The change was made easier for some of the old inhabitants of Obertsrot since they were originally religious refugees from Salzburg, Austria. Having been driven out of Salzburg because of their Protestant faith, they converted once more to Catholicism, in order not to be displaced for a second time. The domains of the Bishop of Speyer and those of the Counts of Eberstein would not accept Protestant immigrants.
When the Count of Eberstein and the Margrave of Baden, both ruling princes in the region, converted to the new faith and the influence of the Bishop of Speyer waned, the Protestant dogma was readily accepted by the people. The year 1556 saw the official introduction of Protestant doctrine. Count Wilhelm von Eberstein supported it wholly and created a Protestant parish in Gernsbach, complete with Protestant teachers and counselors. Since that time there are two churches: the lower or Protestant and the upper or Catholic Church.
Count Wilhelm had attended the Diet of Worms in 1521. He met Luther and had declared his loyalty to him. His marriage to Elizabeth von Hanau strengthened the Lutheran hold in the county. She was a devout Protestant and suppressed all those subjects who failed to accept the new doctrine. According to the law, all subjects had to be of the same faith as their respective ruler. For the Obertsrot population it meant an end to religious processions and pilgrimages. All vacant ministries were filled by competent preachers and Catholic clergy were rejected as a matter of principle. In Obertsrot the people converted quickly and in large numbers to the new faith. The parish registered five Protestant baptisms in 1579.
Since Weisenbach was the only parish where the Count had the right to appoint the pastor, it recorded the first Protestant minister as well. In 1578 Pastor Koch was installed as pastor and held the post for 46 years. On orders, the citizens of Obertsrot attended divine service in Weisenbach or, when that was canceled, they attended the Protestant church in Selbach. Ministers to the churches in Weisenbach and Selbach had been appointed by the family of Eberstein since antiquity and were, for many years after the religious transformation bastions of Protestantism in the Murgtal.
The year 1624 brought about a change. On March 30, 1624 Count Johann von Eberstein signed the "Ruffach Treaty", named after the town of Ruffach in Elsass, which ended religious freedom in the county. [Note: the 30 Years War, initially a war between Catholics and Protestants, started in 1618 and eventually returned the Southern half of Germany to Catholicism]. Protestant preachers were dismissed and those subjects remaining faithful to its doctrines were expelled, until they recanted under duress. Thus the head of the community of Obertsrot, Jacob Hauser, spent nine years in exile and died faithful to lutheran doctrine. He was not allowed to be buried in Obertsrot and was eventually buried in the Protestant cemetery in Gernsbach. His successor, as well as his colleague in Hilpertsau, both Protestants, were ordered to recant or to resign. Their reply was that they would rather go into exile than to return to Catholicism. As early as 1625 there were no baptisms from Obertsrot recorded in the Gernsbach register, a clear sign that the people returned to the old Catholic faith.
Of course there were still individuals who gave rise to accusations, for in January of 1625 it was reported by the bailiff at Gernsbach: "The Obertsrot citizen Thomas Krieg, participating in the barge traffic, is hereby ordered to become a Catholic or to quit the trade. A fine of 20 Reichstaler was levied against him. The Catholic reeve Hasenohr had advised to exile the unruly Krieg family."
On June 13, 1625 Pater Matthias arrived in the valley. He was a monk who used friendly persuasion with the people of Obertsrot. He managed to convert Thomas Krieg to the old faith. He pleaded to the court on his behalf to forgive the high fine of 20 Reichstaler. He had suffered enough. He was without income and his family had gone hungry. Wendel Karst of Hilpertsau was treated in the same manner.
The year 1625 brought an end to the religious strife in the village. From that time on until today Obertsrot has remained a Catholic village.

Emigrant Surnames:
Götz, Hasenohr, Jankowitsch, Müller, Nees, Schiel, Siebert, Stramm, Strobel

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1795-1913
marriage: 1795-1905
death and burial: 1795-1889
birth and baptism: 1810-1834
birth and baptism: 1834-1869
marriage, death and burial: 1810-1869
Note: Obertsrot shared the services of the priest from the neighboring community of Gernsbach. They belonged to Gernsbach parish but used the chapel in Obertsrot. Some records of Obertsrot parish members can be found with the records from Gernsbach. Hilpertsau is also part of these records.

Links:

Researchers in this area:
Pat Ellifson
Researching Goetz, Götz, Göz, Seiler, Sailer, Späth, Speth

Oberweier (also see Gaggenau)

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Baumstark, Berg, Eisele, Eller, Geiger, Glasstetter, Haas, Haller, Hassel, Hatz, Jüngling, Karcher, Knapp, Kohlbecker, Maier, Melcher, Metz, Müller, Ruf, Sandt, Zimmer

Information Sources:

Links:

Ötigheim

Geography:
Located north of the city of Rastatt, Otigheim covers an area of 10.97 square kilometers. A charming and favorite residential community with approximately 4,000 inhabitants.

History:
This small village was first in a official document in reference to a donation to the monastery of Weissberg as "Ottingham", in the year 788. The monastery of Herrenaub and the noble houses of Eberstein and Baden all owned property in Otigheim. The local nobility which took its name from the village died out shortly after 1374.
Otigheim is best known throughout Europe for its summer time theater. It has one of the largest and best open air stages in all of Germany. The villagers annually present "A Village on Stage", a slogan which established that there are no professionals, only amateurs on the stage, even though they rely on professional support as required.
The founder of the Otigheim plays was Josef Saier, who arrived in the community as a senior priest, in October 1905. His aim was to use the theater as an extension of his pulpit, to counter the perceived general shallowness in his parishioners by directing their thoughts to higher plains, while at the same time creating funds for charitable purposes.
The spectators area, in the shape of a semi-circle, is modified after an antique amphitheater. Initially it was without a roof with seats set in the lawn. Today, the audience area is fully protected with a seating capacity of 4,000 seats.
Annually, the "Town Threatre attracts over 80,000 visitors, carrying Otigheim's reputation beyond the borders of Germany.

Emigrant Surnames:
Durm, Ganz, Günthner, Hammer, Heck, Heid, Kaiser, Kalkbrenner, Karius, Kölmel, Kohm, Kraus, Krebs, Kühn, Kühnle, Küstner, Löchler, Lusch, Maisch, Mattern, Mauterer, Mayer, Nold, Rieger, Sartori, Schlotter, Speck, Stöß, Tritsch, Weinbrecht, Weingärtner, Welz, Weßbecher, Wild, Wingert, Wittmann, Ziegler

Information Sources:
No LDS records available for this town

Links:
http://www.oetigheim.de

Ottenau

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Bindnagel, Frank Farlfinger, Heck, Heitz, Himmel, Hurrle, Kraft, Kramer, Merkel, Pfistner, Schmitt, Schnaibel, Schneibel, Schnaible, Schoch, Schwan, Siebert, Stahlberger, Steiner, Tschan, Weiser, Wunsch

Information Sources:

Links:

Ottersdorf

Geography:
The town of Ottersdorf is located in the Rhine valley seven kilometers west of Rastatt. Covering an area of 7,69 square kilometers, there are 2,300 inhabitants in this town today. Formerly an independent town, Ottersdorf was incorporated into Rastatt in 1971.

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Allgeyer, Bossenmaier, Christ, Früh, Jülg, Ketterer, Leonhard, Leppert, Lott, Müller, Rauch, Reiß, Reuter, Stuber, Uhrig

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth, marriages and burials: 1700-1913

Links:

Researchers in this area: rbelleng@i2k.com
Surnames: Blanck, Gross

Ottersweier

Geography:
Covering an area of 29,21 square kilometers, Ottersweier is located on the southern border of the county of Rastatt.Before the district reform in 1973, this village belonged to the jurisdiction of Buehl. When the District of Buehl was dissolved, Ottersweier became part of the county of Rastatt. In 1986, the population of Ottersweier was 6,000 inhabitants

History:
In old documents, Ottersweier first appears in the year 1150 as "Otterswilere". It was known as a settlement of the Franconian land-extension, and labeled a market town. This market town enclosed the territory between Buhlot and Laufbach. The owners of the market were the Ebersteiners, at first. Later, the region was broken down into Sasbach and Ottersweier. At that time the area was owned by the Margraves of Baden.
The local government was held by the knights of Castle Windeck . The imperial-government of Ortenau ruled Ottersweier in the 14th century.
The peaceful village of Ottenweier had its greatest change in the later part of the 1400's. In the village quarter of "Hub" a noble estate, with a small castle called "In der Hub" was erected. An owner of a bathing establishment was first mentioned in a document from the year 1475. From that time on "The Hub" was confirmed as a bath. Bath Hub came under the authority of the Margraves of Baden in 1722. It had been the baths of margraves and kings. In 1811, Friedrich Weinbrenner built the new bath buildings for the Margraves in Baden. During the following decades the baths slowly decayed into a state of ruin. In 1870 they were near financial disaster.
The district government of Karlsruhe and Baden brought the whole facility in 1874. They established a nursing institute for the districts, which is still in operation today.
About 5,700 inhabitants are living at Ottersweier. At the beginning of 1972, the village of Unzhurst became a village district of Ottersweier by a voluntary agreement.

Emigrant Surnames:
Albrecht, Armbruster, Bäuerle, Baßler, Bauer, Binder, Birnbräuer, Brust, Burkkart, BUrger, Burgert, Burkart, Burst, Debano, Dinger, Dischler, Doll, Doninger, Eckerle, Egner, Eicher, Eisele, Engelmeier, Ernst, Falk, Filter, Fischer, Frank, Friedmann, Fuß, Graf, Gutmann, Hasenohr, Haungs, Hauser, Heid, Heitzler, Hemberger, Herrmann, Herzog, Heß, Hettich, Hiepp, Hintzler, Hipp, Hörth, Höß, Huber, Huck, Hug, Hund, Jörger, Jung, Kappler, Ketterer, Kirschner, Kist, Klein, Klumpp, Knößel, Kohler, Kopf, Lechleiter, Lion, Lorenz, Meier, Merk, Metzinger, Metzinger, gennant Stefanstochter, Mirschler, Morgenthaler, Moeßner, Moser, Müller, Netz, Nikai, Oberle, Oechsle, Oser, Rapp, Reck, Rettig, Rheinschmitt, Röck, Rummel, Rumpf, Sackmann, Sauer, Schabeberle, Schaufler, Scheer, Schehr, Scherzinger, Scheurer, Schindler, Schmalz, Schmälzle, Schneider, Schrempp, Schuh, Schwarz, Seifermann, Sickinger, Sirjaques, Speiler, Spinner, Steidel, Steier, Straub, Streit, Trapp, Veith, Vierling, Volz, Wäldele, Walch, Waßmer, Weber, Weiler, Wis, Weiser, Willi, Wimmer, Wörner, Ziegler, Zimmer, Zinck, Zorn

Information Sources:
Ottersweier (Buehl)
Evangelical-Lutheran
birth and baptism: 1855-1962
marriages: 1861-1962
death and burial: 1895-1962

Ottersweier (Ottersweier)
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1810-1870
birth and baptism: 1855-1962
marriages: 1810-1870
marriages: 1861-1962
death and burial: 1810-1870
death and burial: 1895-1962

Links:

Plittersdorf

Geography:
The former independent town of Plittersdorf is located ten kilometers southwest of the city of Rastatt. It is well-known throughout the county of Rastatt for its Rhein ferry service. In 1974, the 3,000 inhabitants of Plitterdorf were incorporated into the city of Rastatt.

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Beck, Dietsch, Fischang, Fritz, Hauns, Köppel, Lorenz, Müller, Nold, Reiter, Uhrig, Wehrle, Weyland

Information Sources:
Catholic
births: 1717-1901
confirmations: 1791, 1828
marriage: 1719-1786
marriage: 1796-1913
burials: 1718-1900
The LDS microfilm of records for Ottersdorf begins in 1700, and the first section, through 1717, includes the records of Plittersdorf and Wintersdorf. They were all recorded together in the Ottersdorf book at that time.

Links:



Important Addresses:

(Landkreis Rastatt Archives)
Kreisarchiv fur den Landkreis Rastatt
Landratsamt
Herrenstr 13
Postfach 1863
76437 Rastatt

LDS Archives for all of Germany
Kirche Jesu Christi der HLT
Abteilung Genealogie
Steinmühlstraße 16
61352 Bad Homburg vor der Höhe

General Land Archives
Generallandesarchiv Karlsruhe
Nördliche Hildapromenade 2
76133 Karlsruhe

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