Landkreis Rastatt

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This is an alphabetic listing of information on thecommunities that have existed within Landkreis Rastatt. Select the correct letter here, to locate the alphabetic section that contains the community that you are researching and valuable information about it.

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B
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E
F
G
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I-P
R-Z

Affental

Geography:
Affental is an ancient winery village in the Buehl valley in middle Baden. Its location is 6 kilometers north of the District city of Buehl.

History:
The Affental red wine was well-known as early as 1330. At that time, the Cistercian Cloister of Lichtental owned the vineyards. The development of the fiery Burgundy wines started with the women of this cloister. Aloys Schreiber, noted historiographer, wrote"I should always take off my hat before every glass of Affental Sheltered in the mountainous foothills, the vineyards and natural granite soil of the region produce wines known throughout the world today.
As one enters the village of Affental, on the old Mill Stream Road, lined with frame-work houses, the first thing seen is the Chapel, built in 1754. The chapel was named St. Gallus.
In the early 1850's a new romanistic basilica was built. At the same time the building of the rectory was begun. Bishop Lothar von Kuebel, son of Sinzheim residents, consecrated the new House of God on September 20, 1868. The inhabitants of Affental celebrate this date with a festival every year. To cancel out the building debts of the Basilica, a church building fee was levied. The most highly taxed of the 349 payers contributed 29 gulden a year; the least paying parishioner paid one kreuzer.
A Natural Wine Society of Affental was founded in 1909. It was the second society of this sort in the wine region of Baden. The city of Buehl established a wine market in 1872. In 1931, a distilled spirits market took place with the wine market in Baden.

Emigrant Surnames: (from Eisental and Affental)
Bauer, Baumann, Baumgartner, Baumgärtner, Bender, Ehereisser, Fanz, Fritz, Geiges, Graf, Hahn, Harbrecht, Hochstuhl, Keller, Kirschner, Krauth, Kunz, Maier, Mayer, Meier, Moser, Mürb. Oser, Pflininger, Reith, Rupp, Schmidt, Schütt, Seiter, Stark, Störk, Straub, Streule, Vetter, Vollmer, Weil, Weis, Ziegler

Information Sources:
Catholic
1754-1852 St. Gallus
1870-1900

Researchers in this area: Links:

Altschweier

Geography:
Altschweier is located four km. directly south of the district capitol of Buhl. In 1972, through incorporation, Altschweier was one of the many villages of the area that was consolidated into the city of Buhl.
The Basilica dominates the skyline of both the village and country-side. The village is surrounded by a "forest" of plum trees, beyond which are terraces of vineyards. The houses of Altschweier crowd the river Buehlot. Signs of prosperity are evident in the style of the farm houses, some of which are in the Kizingtal style, while others are two storied half-timbered houses. The countryside is dominated by the Schartenberg Mountain, which protects the village from icy winds so that the favorable climate and fertile soil of the region result in high volume fruit production. Peach trees were planted around the turn of the century and production reached its peak in the thirties, however the winter of 1939/40 wiped out all the orchards.

History:
The residence of Altschweier are proud of their parish church of St. Gallus. It took thirty years of struggle with the government before they achieved their wish for a church of their own.
Initially, there was only a small St. Gallus chapel, actually too small for the number of residence of the town. So the residents were divided. The people of Altschweier living on the Buhl side of the river were incorporated into the parish in Buhl called St. Peter and Paul's. The residents on the opposite side of Altschweier became parishioners of St. Mary's parish in Kappelwindeck. Between 1824 and 1868 all the inhabitants of Altschweier planning to attend services or bury their dead had to travel to Kappelwindeck.
In 1870, the parish in Altschweier received its own priest, Rev. Joseph A. Kappler, who had been employed in the parish at Kappelwindeck for forty years. He bequeathed a large sum of money to the villagers of Altschweier for construction of a church and parsonage. Building was started on the Buhl side of the village by the architect, Heinrich Hubsch. He designed the church in the Romanesque style as a basilica. When Bishop Lothar von Kuebel consecrated the church on September 20,1888 the villagers turned the occasion into a festival, which is still celebrated today.

Emigrant Surnames:
Baumann, Bechtold, Eberle, Ebler, Eckert, Ehreiser, Fauth, Frey, Götz, Gretz, Grohe, Häußler, Herrmann, Hörth, Huber, Jägel, Jost, Kirschner, Kohler, Linz, Maushart, Mayer, Meier, Morath, Moser, Müller, Pfetzer, Rapp, Rheinschmitt, Rettig, Rieser, Ruckenbrod, Rummel, Schäfer, Schemel, Schmidt, Schorla, Seifried, Seiter, Vetter, Werner, Winter, Zimmerman

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1810 - 1870
marriage: 1810 - 1900
death and burial: 1810 - 1900

Links:
Altschweier Home Page

Au Am Rhein

Geography:
The village of Au am Rhein can be found in the northern region of the county of Rastatt. It obtained its name from its location in the Rhein Valley, at the most northern part of the Rheinau Woods. This ancient village is only 10 miles or 15 kilometers from the coast of France. A tidy community of only 2,800 residence, its size is 13.28 square kilometers.

History:
Earliest reference to Au was in the year 811 A.D. when it was the home of the estate of priest, Milo. Later, the monasteries of Hirsau and Cloister Reichenbach owned property in Am.
The Romans left behind their traces in Am. A roman leuga was stored in the tower of the old parish church. A leuga was a Gallic measure of distance 2.2 km = 1.4 miles. The leuga supported the theory that a Roman road existed from Baden-Baden (called Aquae by the Romans) to Au, which crossed the Rhein river, at Au.
The Channel house in Au had four Roman gods depicted in gold in its cornerstone. Until the end of the 19th century gold was still being mined in the Rhein Valley area near Au.
Today these ancient artifacts of Au can be seen in the Baden State Museum in Karlsruhe.

Emigrant surnames:
Abert, Angele, Ball, Bauer, Baumstark, Brendel, Brunner, Busch, Fahrner, Ganz, Gimbler, Göpf, Großmann, Heitz, Herrmann, Hertweck, Hettel, Hirth, Hoch, Hönig, Huditz, Jäger, Karecher, Kast, Kessel, Klumpp, Krieg, Lumpp, März, Mayer, Melcher, Merkel, Merz, Müller, Peter, Pflüger, Schröder, Schweigert, Stahlberger, Steinel, Steinle, Weißenburger, Weß, Weßbecher, Werz.

Information Sources:
LDS records:
Evangelical, Lutheran
births and baptism: 1849 - 1962
marriage, church and civil 1861 - 1933
death and burial 1861 - 1962

Links:

Au im Murgtal

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:

Information Sources:

Links:

Balzhofen

Geography:
Located in the rich lands of the Rhein Valley, Balzhofen is five and one-half kilometers north of the district city of Buehl.

History:
Balzhofen was developed from a feudal estate and was part of the region under the jurisdiction of the Monastery at Schwarzach. The Margraves of Baden and the Roder family owned extensive property here also.
A chapel was erected in Balzhofen in 1701. It was a very simple wooden structure. In 1784, a larger Chapel was built, but was kept in the simple baroque style common in the region between the Black Forest and the Rhein.
A farming community right out of a picture book. One glance confirms the village as an agricultural settlement. Newspapers are canceled during spring planting, for only winter permits time for reading.
Villagers consider to be important, the school, which was built in 1914, the General Store of the Eringer family and the Inn, At the Sign of the Crown, where villagers go after Sunday services to talk politics.
Due to the reformation act of 1973, the village of Balzhofen was incorporated into the city of Buehl.

Emigrant Surnames:
Burkart, Ehinger, Göhringer, Götz, Hensel, Ibach, Jäger, Jörger, Lienhard, Manz, Meier, Meyer, Reith, Royal, Scherzinger, Seiler, Strack, Wiemer, Wild, Wolf

Information Sources:
Balzhofen (Balzhofen)
Catholic
baptism, marriage and burial: 1810-1870

Balzhofen (Oberbruch)
Catholic
baptism, marriage and burial: 1810-1870

Balzhofen (Vimbuch)
Catholic
baptism, marriage and burial: 1810-1870
family registry: 1850

Links:

Barnhalt

Geography:

History:

Information Sources:

Links:

Bermersbach

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Barth, Bauer, Fritz, Geiser, Götz, Hoch, Krämer, Krieg, Kröner, Maier, Mayer, Merkel, Roth, Staub, Stößer, Wagner, Wunsch

Information Sources:
See Forbach

Links:

Bietigheim

Geography:
The Bundesstrasse (Federal Route) 36 is one of the main traffic arteries of the county of Rastatt and runs through the community of Bietigheim in the northern part of this county. With a population of more than 5,200, this is not one of the smaller communities of this county. Here, as in many other striving communities, agriculture has taken a backseat to the smaller and mid-size industries, now dominating the economic structure.

History:
Bietigheim was first mentioned in the year 991 under the name Buadincheim. Remnants of the old foundations and Roman coins point to a settlement during Roman times, and a Roman trades route leads past the settlement to Baden-Baden.
During the 13th century, a local noble family ruled the town, whose dependents were vassals of the Court of Eberstein. Possessions of the monasteries of Weibenburg, Herrenalb and Lichtenal, as well as the margrave of Baden have been documented.
When the margraviate remained catholic after the withdraw of the Swedes in 1634, it meant continuity for the Bietigheims, at least concerning their religion. Previously they had to switch denominations repeatedly even within one century, due to the constant change in rulership.
In 1808/09 and upon invitation by the Russian Czar, several Bietigheim families had emigrated to Rastatt and Seyer in southern Russia. After 1848, many more Bietigheim residents were looking for a new home in the United States.

Emigrant surnames:
Andres, Anselment, Arrand, Augenstein, Beck, Beckert, Bertsch, Brunner, Dreixler, Dürrschnabel, Fritz, Ganz, Hartmann, Heck, Herm, Hettel, Hornung, Jung, Kambeitz, Karle, Klumpp, Kühn, Matz, Mockert, Nagel, Nold, Rapp, Rastätter, Rittler, Schenkel, Schmitt, Schröder, Schröter, Silber, Stoll, Strotz, Trickel, Volz, Würz

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1585 - 1890
marriages: 1693 - 1896
death and burial: 1607 - 1894
family registers: 1808 - 1877
Civil
births: 1808 - 1888
family registers: 1818 - 1888

Links:

Researchers in this area:
www.jennifer.heer.com
jennifer@heer.com

Bischweier

Geography:
The location of Bischweier is best described by its proximity to the "spa" city of Baden-Baden. From Baden-Baden you would travel 2 km. to the town of Gernsbach. From Gernsbach travel 5 km. straight north. At the entrance of the Murgtal Valley, of the River Murg, is Bischweier. The village of Bischweier is 13.90 square kilometers in size. It's nickname is "Kirchendorf" (Cherry Village) because of the large volume of fruit grown in the fertile valley soil. With a population of nearly 6,000, only 5% of today's inhabitants earn their living from agriculture. Even with it's craft shops and business concerns, Bischweier is today clearly a "dormitory community", meaning people live here, but work elsewhere.

History:
Excavation in the region points to the presence of a Roman settlement, because a Roman estate was found at the nearby village of Oberweier.
Bischweier was first mentioned in documents in the year 1288, as a hamlet of the bishop, probably the bishop of Speyer. This theory is strengthen by the fact that Bischweier has been linked, from early times both religiously and politically with Rotenfels, which has belonged to Speyer since 980. Of historical value are the gothic wall paintings in the ancient St.Ann's Chapel. The chapel today serves the Lutheran faithful as a place of worship.
In 1844/45 a 14.5 km. long horse-drawn railway was built between Bischweier and Rastatt. It was used to have construction material from Bischweier moved to Rastatt for the fortress of Rastatt, a fortress of the German Confederate.

Emigrant Surnames:
Busch, Föry, Gerstner, Jocher, Jörger, Jung, Keller, Mack, Müller, Rieger, Säckinger, Scherer, Simon, Späth, Westermann, Zimmermann

Information Sources:
LSD Records: There are no records found for Bischweier. Records for the "parent parish" of Rotenfels.
Catholic:
birth and baptism:
1616-1901
marriage, civil and church:
1614 - 1668
1670 - 1678
1692 - 1913
death and burial:
1614 - 1622
1630 - 1638
1649 - 1669
1696 - 1912
family registers:
1790 - 1930

Links:

Bühl

Geography:
Originally the town of Buehl was the county seat for the county with the same name. When the German government redrew the boundaries of their counties in 1973, the county of Buehl was dissolved. Later, in 1973 Buehl was annexed to the newly formed county of Rastatt.
Located near the romantic Black Forest Mountain Road, Buehl is directly 15 kilometers west of Baden-Baden. With its various town districts, Buehl stretches up to an elevation of 1040 meters in the area bordering the Black Forest Mountains Road. Balzhofen, is situated at its lowest point at 130 meters.
The town of Buehl, in the middle of the fruit growing region is nicknamed "Plum City", with a plum festival in early October as its annual event. Today, the population of over 25,000 residents makes Buehl the third largest city in the new county of Rastatt.

History:
Roman milestones, extensive coin finds and pot remains indicate an early Roman settlement in the area of Buehl.
Around 1149 the town first appears in documents with the name Buhel (meaning hillock). The name was officially changed to Bühel in 1283.
By the first quarter of the 14th century, the town had acquired its own court, (both a legislative and an administrative body) with this was an assigned village mayor. It also established a trial court of its own. This allowed it to be granted its own court seal, which it has retained as a city seal to this day.
The right to hold an annual fair was tightly controlled in the old German states. Buehl was approved to have such a fair, called a "Jahrmarkt " as early as 1403 and by 1442 was allowed to hold a weekly Farmers' Market. These steps had secured its roll as an economic power a generation before Columbus.
In 1514, the church, called St. Peter and Paul's (today Town Hall 1) was built on the site of the 15th century Benedictine Monastery, by architect Hans von Maulbronn.
Buehl was not without problems. The town was completely burned down in the 1600's during the 30 Years War. In 1689 the town was again destroyed by the French.
Margrave von Baden, in 1767 acquired the imperial fief of Buehl for 30,000 florin. The section of Buehl situated south of the Buhlot thus becomes part of Baden.
The upswing came during the 19th century when the market town of Buehl was elevated to the status of a city by Grand Duke Leopold von Baden. The 1800's brought much renovation to the city. The Town Hall was built on the site of the former parish church, incorporating the church tower into its design. The new neo-gothic city church of St. Peter and Paul was built and consecrated in 1877.
In 1930, Buehl, saw the incorporation of the communities of Kappelwindeck and later the towns of Neuweier, Steinbach and Varnhalt. Although Buehl lost its rank as a county seat with the county reform, it enjoyed a substantial benefit from the accompanying municipal reform, which allowed it to nearly double in population by annexing the formerly independent communities of Oberweier, Oberbruch, Neusatz (all in 1971), Balzofen, Eisenthal (both in 1972), and (in 1973) Altschweier, Moos, Vimbuch and Weitenung.

In the years 1148/49 - St. Peter and Paul, Earliest Catholic Church

Emigrant Surnames:
Abele, Berdon, Berger, Bloch, Bodenheimer, Bordolo, Bubenhofer, Bühler, Burgert, Burkart, Burkhard, Christ, Doll, Eckerle, Edelmann, Eisele, Fanz, Fensch, Fertig, Flick, Fraaß, Grank, Frey, Frietschi, Frietschy, Fritz, Geieger, Götz, Graf, Groß, Hagenjos, Hasenforter, Haungs, Heimann, Heitz, Herzog, Hettler, Hildebrand, Hils, Hirschbühl, Hockenjoos, Hoerth, Hofer, Hunkler, Jäckel, Jäckle, Jägel, Klein, Konrad, Kuster, Landherr, Lang, Levi, Lieber, Liebich, Maurath, Maushard, Meier, Meister, Meixel, Mertz, Meyer, Moeppert, Moerch, Morgenthaler, Müller, Netter, Niedhammer, Oehgass, Ollry, Oster, Peter, Pezold, Pfaadt, Pflegber, Rapp, Reingried, Reinschmidt, Reis, Rheinbold, Rinschler, Rödler, Roos, Sackmann, Scheidet, Schick, Schickel, Schlageter, Schleh, Schmieder, Schmitt, Schnabel, Schüßler, Schweizer, Sebert, Seiter, Seith, Sinsheimer, Speuer, Springer, Strack, Strobel, Weil, Wenk, Wertheimer, Wiedmaier, Winter, Wippermann, Wirth, Wisch, Wohlgemuth, Wolf, Wunsch, Zachmann, Zaehler, Zapf, Zeis, Ziegler, Zöller

Information Sources:
Catholic birth , marriages and deaths: 1625-1938

Stadtverwaltung Buehl
Hauptstr.47
77815 Buehl
Telefax 01149-7223-935207

Links:

Buhlertal

Geography:
The roughly 8.000 residents of this residential, recreational and mountain resort of Buehlertal with Untertal (lower valley) and Obertal (upper valley) stretches from the Rhein plain (150 meters above sea level) all the way up to the colored sand stone surface of Schwarzwald ( 770 meters above sea level). Buehlertal covers an area of 17,68 square kilometers.

History:
In 1325, this place appears for the first time in documents as "Hugeltal". Even before this first document the Ebersteins were the first landlords, and on their part they rewarded the knights and nobles, Von Windeck, with this land.
Known as an agricultural town, for a long time the farmers grew the best plums and grapes for the wine makers of the region.
Next to the smaller craft and industrial establishments, a branch plant of the Bosch firm offers employment opportunities.
An important asset here is tourism, since a section of the Black Forest Overpass passes over Buehlertal.
There was a small hospital in this community, which in 1903 the great Dutchess, Luise Von Baden, dedicated. Today, the hospital is closed and is kept as a hospital exhibit due to its historical importance.
Gone is the train which earlier connected the valley with the city of Buehl. Remaining is the neighborly feelings between the communities.

In the year 1325 - St. Michael, Earliest Catholic Church

Emigrant Surnames:
Bäuerle, Baumann, Berdon, Bernhard, Berwanger, Bey, Boy, Blun, Braun, Braxmeier, Brügel, Burkard, Burkart, Butsch, Coi, Decker, Diler, Dorn, Dresel, Egner, Ehereiser, Erhard, Faller, Gschwender, Gutmann, Hedinger, Heisch, Henkel, Herrmann, Hils, Höll, Hörth, Horcher, Ihle, Jost, Karcher, Kauzmann, Koch, Koegel Kohler, Kraemer, Kraus, Kuest, Kunz, Landele, Langenbacher, Liebmann, Ludwig, Manz, Meier, Meyer, Muerb, Müller, Naber, Nesselhauf, Oberle, Oesterle, Pabst, Rapp, Reinschmidt, Reinschneid, Reith, Rettig, Riehle, Rühle, Rumpf, Schäfer, Schaufler, Schenk, Schmalz, Schmieder, Schmidt, Schneider, Schoch, Schofer, Schühle, Sebacher, Seifermann, Seifried, Seiter, Spieß, Steuer, Steuerer, Stößer, Stolz, Strahl, Stricker, Striebel, Strübel, Weck, Wek, Weis, Welle, Wesbacher,Wittmann, Wolf, Zäpfel, Ziegler, Zink

Information Sources:
Catholic
births, marriages and burials: 1763 -1900
family registry: 1800, 1808, 1810, 1830 - 1858

Links:
The Buehlertal, Baden Home Page

cybermom@springnet1.com

Durmersheim

Geography:
Durmersheim is located only eight kilometers south of the city of Karlsruhe. It serves as a suburban town to the commuters of the city of Karlsruhe. The area first belonged to the precinct of Kuppenheim, but is now a part of the county of Rastatt. The population with the absorbed villages of Bickelsheim and Würmersheim numbers 10, 800 inhabitants.

History:
(with the ancient villages of Bickesheim and Würmersheim)
The city of Durmersheim dates back to the sixth century, when it was part of the Weissenburg Monastery. It appeared as "Turmaresheim" (Home of Turmar) in official documents as early as 991. The present day spelling first appeared in the records around 1388.
Between 1244 and 1350 there was a clan of knights named after the town. The former moated castle called Rohrburg, mentioned as early as 1388, today only exist in the history books. The castle was totally dilapidated by the 18th century.
The old monastery and the Bickesheim church of St. Mary are located on the northern edge of Durmersheim. Bickesheim was an independent town until the 14th century, when it was taken over by the villagers of Durmersheim. As early as 1683 there are written reports of the portrait of Madonna in the church, to which miracles were attributed. In the early 1700's there are reports of pilgrimages to Bickesheim-Durmersheim, from all over the area.
As part of the municipal reforms in the early 1970's of Baden-Wurttemburg the former ancient town of Würmersheim, with about 1,500 residents, was incorporated with Durmersheim into one municipality. Artifacts from the stone age, and major Roman digs from the days of the Roman and Alleman tribe, provide insight into the ancient past of Würmersheim history.

Emigrant Surnames:
Abath Becker, Bertsch, Braun, Brunner, Buchmüller, Datz, Dunz, Dutenhofer, Ell, Enderle, Flasak, Ganz Görig, Gräfenäcker, Greif, Häfele, Hammer, Heck, Heinz, Hettel, Höger, Kary, Kassel Kastner, Kiefer, Kistner, Kock, Koffler, Kössel, Lrug, Lang, Maier, Manz, Martin, Mayer, Nägele, Obert, Ocks, Ring, Rummel, Sattler, Schlager, Schuler, Schwamberger, Seiberlich, Siegel, Späth, Tritsch, Völlinger, Vollmer.

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1660-1714
birth and baptism: 1716-1895
marriages: 1672-1900
death and burial: 1675-1895
confirmations: 1726-1756
confirmations: 1762-1856
family registry: 1756, 1762, 1856

civil records:
births: 1849-1930
births: 1934-1962
marriages: 1859
marriages: 1861-1933
marriages: 1943-1961
death and burial: 1860-1962

Links:

Ebenung

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:

Information Sources:

Links:

Eisental

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames: (from Eisental and Affental)
Bauer, Baumann, Baumgartner, Baumgärtner, Bender, Ehereisser, Fanz, Fritz, Geiges, Graf, Hahn, Harbrecht, Hochstuhl, Keller, Kirschner, Krauth, Kunz, Maier, Mayer, Meier, Moser, Mürb. Oser, Pflininger, Reith, Rupp, Schmidt, Schütt, Seiter, Stark, Störk, Straub, Streule, Vetter, Vollmer, Weil, Weis, Ziegler

Information Sources:

Links:

Elchesheim (see also Illingen)

Geography:
Located on the northern Rhein River and sharing the Goldkanal Lake both the town of Illingen, the population today with the town of Illingen today is only 2,700 inhabitants.

History:
Eschesheim was first mentioned in official records in 1102. From 1250 to 1300 there was a local aristocracy, whose roots were in Wasserburg Elchesheim. The town, like so many others was completely burned to the ground by the French troops in 1689. Afterwards many of the inhabitants migrated into southwest Europe. By the 1800's many of the descendants of the Elchesheim residents immigrated to the United. States.
Elchesheim was incorporated with the town if Illingen through the co-operation of each town in 1923.
The District reforms of 1 July 1971 united the two towns on a permanent basis.

Emigrant Surnames:
Altenbach, Aman, Arnold, Beiter, Engelhard, Fettig, Fortenbacher, Fütterer, Heck, Herz, Joram, Kistner, Kleinbub, Kölmel, Kraft, Kuhn, Melzer, Müller, Oberle, Völlinger, Weiler

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1702 - 1733
birth and baptism: 1742 - 1897
marriages: 1705 - 1707
marriages: 1717 - 1781
marriages: 1786 - 1904
death and burial: 1719 - 1733
death and burial: 1782 - 1941
family register: 1831
Herausgegeben von der Kolpingfamilie Iffezheim 1926 e. V. im Jahre 1985 Gesamtherstellung: Druckerei Durrschnabel, 7551 Elchesheim-Illingen

(translation)"WRITINGS ON THE KOLPING FAMILY OF IFFEZHEIM 1926"compiled in 1985 by Durrschnabel Printing Company in Elschseheim-Illingen

Researchers in this area:John@johnmerkel.com

Links:

Forbach

Geography:
The community of Forbach, in the Murgtal (Murg Valley) covers by far the largest area of any incorporated municipality in the county of Rastatt, at least in terms of land area. Of the just over 284 square miles in the county, Forbach takes up almost 51 of that, and over 46 of that is covered by forest. Still, the modest population (around 57,000 counting the various satellite communities) does not put Forbach into the ranks of the larger counties.

History:
In 1361, the roman fortress of Forbach was supposedly turned over to the Weissenburg Monastery as a fiefdom by Wilhelm of Eberstein. Today no trace remains of the old fortress. The only remaining hint of this piece of the past is the name Castle Rock, which is the name of the parish at Raumuenzach. From 1368 on, Forbach lay under the joint condominium of the Counts of Eberstein and the Margraves of Baden, after some fifty per cent of the community had been transferred to the House of Baden through sale. Via the Diocese of Speyer the other half came to be part of Baden in 1676.
Many of the enclaves and estates in the Forbach community are quite spread out from the center of town. This is particularly true for the small former lumbering hamlets like Herrenweis, at the edge of the Black forest Highway, and Hundsbach, in the shadow of the Hornisgrinde mountain.
The Schwarzenbach Dam, between Herrenweis and Forbach, has special significance beyond its immediate area, as the dam's Powerplant plays an important role in regional hydroelectric generation. Beyond this, the Murgtal area has several established paper mills and quarries that remain economically significant, along with the timber industry.
With the state land reform in Baden-Wurttemburg in mid 1974, Forbach became even larger. Forbach annexed the previously independent municipalities of Bermersbach, Gausbach and Langenbrand.

Emigrant Surnames:
Bauer, Beck, Blausch, Burger, Burkert, Decker, Dieterle, Fallmoser, Faßer, Filder, Fortenbacher, Frick, Fritz, Fritz (genannt Mugenast), Gaiser, Geiser, Geisler, Gernsbock, Gerstner, Götz, Haas, Heiler, Herrmann, Hettich, Hoch, Hoffmann, Hofmann, Karcher, Kaub, Kaub (genannt in der Klamm) Keiser, Kiemer, Kleehammer, Klumpp, König, Krämer, Kraft, link, Maier, Mayer, Meier, Marx, Merkel, Merkel (genannt bei der Kirch) Mörmann, Moser, Müller Mungenast, Neff, Reiner, Roth, Rothenberger, Ruckenbrod, Schaub, Schauffler, Schelling, Schiel, Schillinger, Schmidt, Schock, Schweitzer, Spissinger, Staub, Stefan, Steiner, Stoll, Storz, Vogel, Warth Wasmer, Welzenberger, Werner, Wörner, Wunsch, Wunsch (genannt in der Bach) Wunsch (genannt in der Kräwengaß) Wunsch (genannt auf dern Rain)

Information Sources:
Forbach (Bermersbach)
Catholic
birth, marriages, death and burial records: 1810 - 1869
Forbach (Gausbach)
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1621-1909
marriages: 1720-1907
death and burial: 1720-1900
family registry: 1720
Forbach (Forbach)
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1621-1909
marriages: 1621-1909
death and burial: 1621-1900
family registry: 1720
birth and baptism: 1953 - 1963
marriages: 1953 - 1960
death and burial: 1953 - 1963

Links:

Freiolsheim (also see Gaggenau)
mit Moosbronn
und Mittelberg

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Abendschön Anselm, Bauer, Braxmeier, Muhlinger, Decker, Essig, Glasstetter, Göring, Götz, Götzmann, Grässle, Harlfinger, Herr, Herrmann, Hirt, Huber, Kull, Laub, Lauinger, Merklinger, ÖhlerRieger, Rund, Schäfer, Schoch, Schoenwald, Siegwarth, Walther, Wunderlich, Zimmer

Information Sources:

Researchers in this area:
glassman@iquest.net
Researching Surnames: Glasstetter (Glassteadter, Glasstedter), Bauer, Schoch

Links:

Gaggenau, Stadt

Geography:

History:
Gaggenau originally called "Gackenouwe" was first mentioned in the Rotenfels parish registers in 1243. By 1288, it was an expansion within the dukedom of Rtenfeld.
It was first mentioned as Gaggenau when the Margrave was divided for Herman VII of Baden.
The trades soon flourished in Gaggenau. In 1681, an iron hammer was at work there, from which the oldest iron production works of the city originated, the Iron Works Gaggenau. This laid the foundation for the economic and industrial rise of Rindenschwender.
Mr. Rindenschwender founded a glass works and gypsum works in 1772. housing for 16 glass blowers and their families was added. The timber framed house with the bell-tower ( now a land mark) was called Rindenschwender Glassworks. Another strong basis of the Gaggenau industry was the Benz-Works founded by Michael Flurscheim and Theodore Bergmann. In 1894, the first cars were built in the Murg Valley. A company merger between Gaggenau Works and Daimler-Benz was the start of the world wide victory march of the diesel engine.
In the western part of the city lies the former Bad Rotenfels. The mineral bath spa there dates back to the discovery of the Elizabeth Spring in 1839.
Gaggenau benefited from the Baden-Wurtembuerg reforms, since the actual town has fewer than half the total number of inhabitants. The villages of Bad-Rotenfels and Selbach were added in 1970. One year later Freiosheim was added. In 1972, Oberweiser and Moosbronn (previously part of the village of Bernsbach) became part of the city. 1973 saw Sulzbach and finally Horden and Michelbach were added in 1975.

Emigrant Surnames:
Adam, Ball, Black, Corneli, Eckert, Ehleiter, Eheleiter, Eisenmann, Fritsch, Fritz, Fütterer, Götzmann, Graf, Hartmann, Henkele, Herm, Heß, Hilzinger, Himmel, Hirth, Hoffer, von Holl, Hornung, Hurrle, Jäger, Kleehammer, Klingele, Köhler, Kohlbecker, Kohm, Lang, Little, Maisch, Mark, Mayer, Melcher, Merkel, Müller, Rauenbühler, Rettig, Reutenberger, Scheuermann, Schiffmacher, Schindler, Schmadel, Schmitt, Seeholzer, Seitz, Siebert, Simon, Sprenger, Stösser, Stricker, Strobel, Traub, Vogt, Wagner, Wittmann, Zapf

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1786-1844
birth and baptism: 1873-1902
marriages: 1786-1907
death and burial: 1786-1899
family register: 1882

Researchers in this area: John@johnmerkel.com
John R Merkel
2922 Delaware Ave
Baltomore, Md.21227 USA

Links:

Gausbach

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Bauer, Bechle, Fritz, Heizler, Kleehammer, Krämer, Mayer, Meier, Merkel, Mungenast, Rassler, Roth, Seidt, Spissinger, Staub, Striebich, Striebig, Weiser, Wunsch

Information Sources:
see Forbach

Links:

Gernsbach
mit Kolonie Rombach

Geography:

History:
Although it can't be documented, Gernsbach, is assumed to be one of the oldest settlements in the Murg Valley. It was first mentioned in a document in the year 1219, in which the settlement in the Murg Valley is referred to as "Genrespach villa". The name supposedly comes from the leader of a franconian tribe, who had moved upstream along the Murg river with his farmers and, had settled along the sunny slopes of the Kugel mountain. At that time, Gernsbach was already under the rule of the house of Eberstein. Starting in 1387, two houses temporarily ruled under one name, the condominate of Eberstein-Baden, which resulted due to the sale of half the town to the margrave of Baden.
The reformation caused another division of the town in 1556, for the subjects in Eberstein had to switch to the protestant religion, while those in Baden remained catholic. Another important date in the history of Gernsbach is the year 1583, when its citizens were able to liberate themselves from serfdom.
Already in the 15th and 16th century, Gernsbach was a booming community, to which the Old City Hall, a marvelous renaissance building in the Patrician style, as well as the still existing society of the "Murgschifferschaft"(Seamen's Guild of the Murg) can testify. However, the town did not escape the confusion of the Thirty-Year War, and the fighting during the revolution of 1849 also left its traces in Gernsbach. Remnants of the fortress of the community, which received the title of "town" in 1250, are also still visible. Only in the oldest parts of the city remain within the ancient city walls.
Today, Gernsbach is often called "the pearl of the Murg valley", and with its 14,000 citizens and an area of more than 82 square kilometers, it is the fourth largest community of the county of Rastatt.
In addition to its considerable industrial structure, the area has also a lively tourism trade as well as an active cultural life. Paper manufacturers play a special role in Gernsbach. The county's paper manufacturing center, together with its paper manufacturing school and other aspects of this industry, are world renowned.
Gernsbach experienced considerable growth through community reform measures, by which the communities of Staufenberg (1971), Lautenbach (1973), Obertsröt (incl. Hilpertsau, 1974), and Reichental (1975) were incorporated.

Emigrant Surnames:
Aberle, Aichele, Bachmann, Belz, Bender, Benz, Benz(vulgo Wankmüller), Bickenacker, Bischof, Bittmann, Bürgin, Deißler, Deuchler, Dieterle, Dittmann, Drück, Dürr, Eberlin, Elsenhans, Ettlinger, Fieg, Fischer, Gaupp, Gaus, Gelbarth, Gerstner, Girrbach, Gleisle, Gräber, Grohe, Haas, Haug, Heidinger, Hennenhofer, Herzog, Hetzel, Hirth, Jenne, Kärcher, Kaufmann, Kistler, Knecht, Krieg, Kriegr, Langenbach, Leiner, Lemmerich, Lemmermaier, Netter, Neumayer, Pfrang, Rehm, Repple, Tothengatter, Sailer, Sauer, Schabinger, Schandelwein, Schanz, Scheidecker, Schmidt, Schwank, Seiferth, Sonntag, Steimer, Straub, Vetter, Viola, Wagner, Wallraff, Wankmüller, Weil, Weiß, Welper, Wohlschlegel, Wunsch, Würz, Wurz, Zeuner

Information Sources:
Stadtarchiv Gernsbach
Stadtverwaltung
Postfach 140
76584 Gernsbach

Jewish
birth: 1809 - 1869
marriage: 1809 - 1869
death: 1809 - 1869

Catholic
birth and baptism: 1810-1869
marriage: 1810-1869
death and burial: 1810-1869

Civil Records
birth: 1579-1814
birth: 1819-1895
birth: 1901-1963
marriage: 1579-1580
marriage: 1586-1869
death and burial: 1605-1962
family registry: 1578-1862

Evangelical-Lutheran
birth: 1810 - 1869
marriage: 1810 - 1869
death and burial: 1810 - 1869

Links:

Researchers in this area:
Pat Ellifson surnames: Götz, Göz, Goetz, Kalmbacher, Seiler, Sailer, Speth, Späth
Sarah Knecht Jones surname: KNECHT

Grauelsbaum

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Hauss, Herbig, Hummel, Korn, Schwarz, Stengel

Information Sources:

Links:

Researchers in this area:
SAJGE@aol.com

Greffern

Geography:
Greffern is a small village located on the Rhein River between Karlsruhe and Strasbourg, France. Although it is part of the county of Rastatt it is only 20 kilometers west of the city of Baden-Baden.

Emigrant Surnames:
Batzer, Bertisch, Buhlinger, BUrkard, Burkart, Dilger, Feurer Fraß, Friedmann, Gausch, Görth, Götz, Groß, Hoch, Hofmann, Hoffmann, Ihling Jäger, Jörger, Kiefer, Koch, Kohler, Küstner, Kunz, Latzer, Leppert, Lusch, Mußler, Pfisterer, Reif, Reibold, Schuhmacher, Seiler, Sprauer, Stolz, Tritschler, WWalther, Weiler, Weiller, Wetzel, Wurz, Zahn, Zimmer, Zimmermann

History:
Originally, Greffern was under the jurisdiction of Schwarzach. A ferry service existed here because the Abbey of Schwarzach owned considerable properties in Elsass, on the west bank of the Rhein.
Long ago there existed a fresh water fishery and the fishermen formed a guild. However, their number diminished because there was limited income from this occupation.
For the producers and traders in hemp from Buehl, Ottersweiler, Achern and the surrounding areas it was advantageous to transport their harvest to Greffern and then ship it on barges to the market. As bargees, the men of Greffern, sailed the rivers and canals of Europe, particularly the Rhein. Some of them owned there own barges and tugs. The trade in coal from the Ruhr district started at the turn of the century, since it was possible to ship the product from the town of Greffern. Docking facilities were built in the year 1903/4.
A tour of Greffern should include a visit to the pontoon bridge, the first one of which was built in 1875. The catholic church, in Greffern, was built in 1887/8. and today is called, St. Michael"s. Also worth visiting would be the 100 year old Inn called "The Sign of the Ship".

Information Sources:
Catholic-Greffern
birth, marriages and deaths: 1810-1870

Catholic-Schwarzach
birth, marriages and deaths: 1830-1889

Links:

Halberstung

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:

Information Sources:

Links:

Hatzenweier

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Acker, Ambrecht, Baier, Braun, Edelmann, Gerber, Jäger, Jörger, Metzinger, Scheuerer

Information Sources:

Links:

Herrenweis

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Acker, Ambrecht, Baier, Braun, Edelmann, Gerber, Jäger, Jörger, Metzinger, Scheuerer

Information Sources:

Links:

Hildmannsfeld

Geography:
Hildmannsfeld is located only 3 km. west of Schwarzach, its "parent church". Mostly an agricultural village, the growing of tobacco provides the main income to the villagers. Altogether, sixteen communities in the administrative district of Buhl grow tobacco. Through the incorporation act in 1972, Hildmannsfeld became part of the community of Schwarzach.

History:
Hildmannsfeld called Hiltmansvelde in 1391, the field of Hildmann. Its earliest recordings tell how the village was continually visited by plundering scorching mercenaries throughout the centuries.
Even in the earliest times the residents of Hildmannsfeld had a chapel. In 1723, the chapel and most of the town was burnt down. The citizens rebuilt their town. The new chapel is dedicated to St. Wolfgang. Hildmannsfeld being part of Schwarzach explains the patron saint because St. Wolfgang (924 - 994) was a Benedictine monk; like the monks who had built the monastery at Schwarzach.
Around the turn of the 19th century a "staff holder" and later a mayor resided over the town.

In the year 1391 - St. Wolfgang, Earliest Catholic Church

Information Sources:
Catholic
birth and baptism: 1810-1870
marriage: 1810-1870
death and burial: 1810-1870
Civil
birth: 1830-1889
marriage: 1830-1889
death and burial: 1830-1889

Links:

Hilpertsau

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Bandalion, Fritz, Gerstner, Hoch, Kalmbacher, Krieg, Schill, Sieb, Strobel, Weiler, Wörner, Wunsch

Information Sources:

Links:

Researchers in this area:
Pat Ellifson

Hörden (also see Gaggenau)

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Anselm, Bauer, Brückel, Grötz, Häfele, Haitz, Heitz, Hartmann, Hornung, Immer, Karcher, Kiesel, Kräuter, Kraft, Lang, Mendel, Machmann, Rahner, Säuger, Staudinger, Stößer, Streb

Information Sources:

Links:

Hügelsheim

Geography:
Hugelsheim is located 20 kilometers north of the city of Baden-Baden. Located on the Rhein River it is 14,97 square kilometers in size, with a small population of about 4,000 inhabitants.

History:
The first official mention of Hugelsheim was in 788 when the town was part of the estate Elsabgau. In the year 1212 the town belonged to the monastery of Schwarzach, in whose documents Hugelsheim is mentioned with the village of Sollingen to belong to the staff city of Stollhofen. Hugelsheim was sold to the county of Baden in 1309.
Hugelsheim was a farming and fishing village. There was a fisherman guild in 1593. From 1500 until 1778 there was a Rhein River tax to be paid. Until the beginning of the 19th century the citizens had the right to transport goods on the Rhein River.
Today Hugelsheim is the second smallest independent community in the rural district of Rastatt. The "parent church" is located in Wintersdorf.

Emigrant Surnames:
Bätzler, Bechtold, Beck, Bernhard, Diebold, Dreher, Eberle, Eisenmann, Frank, Freissprung, Graf, Gretz, Hüber, Huck, Husser, Jakob, Kärcher, Krämer, Leppert, Löw, Maier, Müller, Peter, Rheinbold, Röder, Schloß Siegel, Spiegelhalter, Ullrich, Vollmer, Weis, Winter

Information Sources:
Evangelical - Lutheran
birth and baptism: 1643 - 1716
birth and baptism: 1727 - 1961
marriages: 1643 - 1963
death and burial: 1643 - 1964

Links:

Hundsbach

Geography:

History:

Emigrant Surnames:
Acker, Ambrecht, Baier, Braun, Edelmann, Gerber, Jäger, Jörger, Metzinger, Scheuerer

Information Sources:

Links:



Important Addresses:

(Landkreis Rastatt Archives)
Kreisarchiv fur den Landkreis Rastatt
Landratsamt
Herrenstr 13
Postfach 1863
76437 Rastatt

LDS Archives for all of Germany
Kirche Jesu Christi der HLT
Abteilung Genealogie
Steinmühlstraße 16
61352 Bad Homburg vor der Höhe

General Land Archives
Generallandesarchiv Karlsruhe
Nördliche Hildapromenade 2
76133 Karlsruhe

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